Media Talk Tech Panel Recap

As PR professionals, it’s imperative to periodically check in with the media to gain a better understanding of the stories they’re looking for and how we can work together to tell those stories.

That’s why last week we, along with the Silicon Valley and San Francisco chapters of PRSA, hosted Jason Wilson of VentureBeat, David Pierce of Wired and Sean Captain of Fast Company at our office to share their thoughts on topics ranging from the state of media to how publications are handling the convergence of technology and politics.

On Audience

Panelists also touched on what they’re looking for from a source. The number one thing? They have to understand the publication’s audience, said Jason Wilson.

On Story Characters

David Pierce added that he has become good at knowing when people are giving him a speech and he’s more interested in finding the character of the story and hearing their experience firsthand.

On Politics

When asked how politics have impacted the newsroom over the past year, the panelists agreed it varies for each publication.

“You think about the role Facebook played in the election, and you realize this is just our world now, and we have to deal with it,” said Pierce. “But we have to ask ourselves where it makes sense for us to get involved and why our readers would care about it.”

On Angles

For Sean Captain, it’s all about how you approach the story. “Everyone wants to jump into the conversation, but you have to find the angle that works for your readership,” he said.

Check out the highlight video below, and take a look at the Highwire and PRSA social channels for videos, quotes and more from the panel!

Decoding Black Hat and DEF CON: A Visual Guide

Hackers descend on Las Vegas this month for Black Hat (July 22-27 at Mandalay Bay) and DEF CON (July 27-30 at Caesars Palace). Both events are opportunities to discuss the latest and greatest in IT security – whether it’s a new vulnerability discovered by threat researchers, or demoing a real-world hack, the Black Hat conference is gaining widespread popularity for today’s hacker.

The conference presents an opportunity for IT security pros looking for ways to protect their networks and gear, software and solutions vendors offering approaches to address security challenges, organizations recruiting talent, and reporters covering the scene, to all come together in one place.

The intensity of the discussions, the intent to recruit, and the concentration of security pros and researchers sharing best practices spotlights widespread networking activities. Often the trickiest part of the week is finding a quiet place to talk. Needless to say, there is a lot going on — thankfully, Highwire PR’s IT security practice offers a visual guide to the week, pointing out especially attractive networking venues, conference-organized activities and other promising social events.

 

Blackhat infographic map July 18 revised

 

It’s no surprise that security venues such as Black Hat, DEF CON, Security BSides and the RSA Conference (which took place earlier this year) continue to attract record numbers of attendees. Organizations and consumers are eager to learn about how to protect themselves and their peers given the seemingly endless inundation of IT attacks and data breaches.

Several Highwire PR members will be on site in Las Vegas during the week of Black Hat and DEF CON — supporting our clients and mingling with the press, all while keeping an ear to the ground on breaking news. Interested in our take on this year’s 2017 Black Hat and DEF CON – let us know!

Talking Tech in NYC

PR Lessons Learned from New York’s Top Media

 

This week Highwire co-hosted a panel with Norwest Venture Partners and Button featuring some of the top tech reporters in New York City. Moderated by Mike Dudas, co-founder of Button, Alex Konrad at Forbes, Ruth Reader at Fast Company, Polina Marinova at Fortune and Jason Del Rey at Recode shared their thoughts on the tech industry as well as tips and tricks for the PR pros pitching them.

From venting about pet peeves (research what they cover before pitching!) to naming tech’s next hot spot (keep your eyes on LA), they shared great insights for those of us in the tech PR business. Read on for some of the top takeaways:

It’s harder to get coverage as a startup.

A decade ago, unicorn tech startups abounded, investment money flowed freely into emerging businesses, and tech reporters could cover these companies in their early growth stages. Flash forward to today — capital is harder to come by, a few companies like Amazon dominate the industry, and many of those early unicorns have since failed. In the words of Alex Konrad, “the tech industry has been a victim of its own success.” As a result, the media covering this space have grown more skeptical of tech startups’ PR pitches on “innovation” and are more likely to trust and write about well-established businesses — who also guarantee more page clicks.  

ButtonMediaPanel

Make sure your exclusive is meaningful.

For media, an exclusive offer means that the reporter has the one and only chance to cover a story. The offer of an exclusive interview with an executive or VC firm alone is not enticing. Consider how what you’re offering adds a unique perspective or angle to the story. As a litmus test, ask yourself if the exclusive access you’re offering will change the headline. If not, then it’s unlikely to help you get that story.

Keep the meat for the meeting.

Tech reporters are suckers for an interesting back story about a startup founder or exec, but they’re less interested if every other reporter knows that story too. Rather than mention this background in your pitch, save these details and let reporters discover them in a one-on-one meeting with your exec. They’ll be more inclined to cover the story if they’re the only ones who have it.

Don’t ruin a good relationship.

Whether you’re navigating a client controversy or pitching an embargoed announcement, remember that your relationships with reporters are delicate and important. PR agencies are hired for their ability to counsel clients, and in a crisis situation, it’s integral to give a client guidance on how a course of action can damage, or even destroy, a relationship with a reporter. When it comes to embargoed pitching, be aware of the competition between media outlets and make sure that all parties receiving embargoed news have the same embargo information. When one publication gets a jump on the news, other reporters are forced to have tough conversations with their editors. Don’t be the one to burn those bridges, because those reporters won’t forget.

Tech PR can be challenging, but hopefully, these lessons will make navigating the tech media landscape a smoother ride.

For anyone who was able to join us Tuesday evening, we’d love to hear your thoughts and takeaways. Feel free to share in the comments section below!

Highwire Spotlight: Behind the Scenes with Our Training Program

Introducing our training program to ensure success in PR

 

Just as technology, politics and culture change at a rapid pace, so do the skills required to succeed in the business communications landscape.  As PR professionals, we are expected to stay at the top of our game and one of the best ways to do that is by constantly challenging ourselves to learn and try new things.

Through the Highwire Training Program, we aim to not only train the skills required for the job (pitching, messaging, writing, etc.) but also for business. To that end, we bring in improv coaches, productivity experts and management consultants to train us in those areas.

Three team members collaborating on a work projectThe Highwire Training Program consists of five complementary pillars:

  • PR Skills: Based on skill level, we offer two tracks: Fundamentals and Advanced
  • Writing/Editing/Pitching: Featuring our writing coach Lauren Edwards from WriteCulture, who conducts monthly level-specific writing, editing and pitching sessions and is available year-round for 1:1 consultations
  • Mid-Management Training: Specifically guides Senior Account Executives through the transition to the Account Manager role
  • Reporter Lunch & Learn: Reporters and editors give us the lowdown on how they work and how we can work best together  
  • Monthly Sessions: A catch-all for the larger skill areas such as productivity and time management, business development, management skills and improv

The old adage goes, “If you’re not growing, you’re dying.” Nowhere is that more relevant than in communications, where you’re only as good as your last article or tweet. Maintaining a solid training program with regular input from all levels is one of the keys to achieve relevancy and proficiency.

 

Keep an eye out for upcoming posts where we share our knowledge about what we’ve learned in training. And learn on!

What PR Pros Can Learn from United’s Blunders

The airline company boasts “friendly skies” but on the ground, not so much.

We’ve all seen the video, eye-rolled over CEO Oscar Munoz’s callous response, jaw-dropped over Munoz’s leaked email identifying the customer (David Dao, MMD) as “disruptive” and “belligerent” and witnessed United’s $1B financial fallout.

Long story short: United messed up. Big time.  

Less than a month after the airline found itself in the headlines for denying two girls from boarding their flight due their choice in attire, people are still buzzing about the company —and not for good reasons.

Crisis Comms 101

So what can we learn? If the scandal has taught us anything, it’s that United Airlines needs a lesson in crisis comms, and social media certainly has the power to escalate situations beyond our control. Case in point, just look at the backlash Pepsi saw after debuting a commercial depicting imagery from the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Using United as a case study in addressing public backlash, corporate comms teams could take a few notes:

  • Act quickly, but thoughtfully – The first mistake United made was issuing a long overdue statement to address the scandal. While the statement was meant to serve as an apology, the failure to apologize directly to the victim, nor recognize him by name, reflected the company’s intent to protect its own reputation versus its customers. When looking to resolve an already-mishandled situation, all perspectives should be considered. By apologizing for “having to re-accommodate” passengers instead of admitting what happened, the situation became dehumanized.
  • Don’t blame the victim – The first rule of customer service? “The customer is always right.” After Munoz issued his statement, a very one-sided email added fuel to the fire by essentially blaming the victim and his behavior for what resulted in his bloody nose. A smart move would have been to take a step back and recognize that ultimately, United was at fault for letting the situation get out of hand. While Munoz apologized for forcibly removing the victim from the flight, he neglected to acknowledge his initial response to the situation or choice of words in his internal note to United employees.
  • Own up to mistakes and learn from them  – While it’s hard to say what’s in store for the future of United Airlines, social media indicates that customers are fleeing. One thing that’s certain is the carrier won’t be able to bounce back from this quickly. And while they might be tempted to release statement after statement, the best thing United can do for now is stay silent until it releases its review on April 30. Since the offboarding scandal so closely follows the leggings controversy, United should look to its latest crisis as a learning experience — whether that entails re-evaluating its current customer policies or publicly acknowledging the faults of all involved.

What’s your take on the United scandal? Join the conversation @HighwirePR and let us know what you thought!

Pepsi/Kendall Jenner: Huge Fail or Big Success?

Picture:Pepsi/AP

Picture:Pepsi/AP

Pepsi missed the mark this week after their ad titled “Jump In” received massive backlash from the online community. “Epic fail”, “tone deaf”, “fiasco” are just a sampling of the online reaction to Pepsi’s advertisement featuring Kendall Jenner — top model and a member of the infamous Kardashian dynasty. Even Martin Luther King Jr.’s daughter, Bernice, tweeted: “If only Daddy would have known about the power of #Pepsi,” alongside an iconic photo of the civil rights leader being pushed back by police during protests.

In response to the fallout, Pepsi apologized on Wednesday for the controversial spot, saying they “missed the mark.”  Sure, the message, which showed a happy band of Millennial protesters, led by Jenner, who offers a can of Pepsi to a smiling police officer, is unlikely. What can brands learn from this disastrous ad?  Was this simply an example of messaging gone wrong?  Or was this roundly criticized ad a success — because at the end of the day, we’re all talking about Pepsi?  

From a PR perspective, the miss was not fully understanding the audience and not properly crafting the right message. By trying to be edgy, Pepsi angered the very community it was trying to reach. And by borrowing imagery from the Black Lives Matter movement, it created a backlash instead of starting a conversation like its ad suggests. In pulling the ad, Pepsi said they were “trying to project a global message of unity, peace and understanding” but instead they cast a negative light on the brand and only time will show the true ramifications of its actions.

What are your thoughts? How do you think Pepsi handled the situation? Do you think the backlash was warranted?

Twilio’s Road to IPO

Image via MarketWatch

Image via MarketWatch

Breaking the Tech IPO Drought

None of Silicon Valley’s famed “unicorns” went public for the first six months of 2016. VC funds seemingly dried up, which fueled concerns in North American tech hubs. It seemed no one would dare to brave the unpredictable market.

Enter Twilio, a fast-growing cloud communications platform with a developer-centric business model and an impressive list of innovative customers such as Uber, Lyft, Airbnb, Box and Coca Cola. The company turned heads with its S-1 filing and the tech community began buzzing about the year’s first IPO.

However, to achieve a successful NYSE listing and continue its aggressive growth trajectory, the company needed to shift from its developer-focused narrative to tell a larger story that resonated with business audiences and potential investors.

 

Setting the Stage

Highwire positioned Twilio as a company with strong leadership, a sound business model and industry-leading technology. We had set this strategy in motion from the beginning of our partnership (three  years running at the time of filing) by examining issues, trends and determining the positioning that would explain Twilio’s technology and business model to a broader audience. We had also developed a concrete base of media relationships before quiet period restrictions impacted communications.Screen Shot 2017-04-04 at 12.58.34 PM

In addition, Highwire used measurement platforms to monitor relevant conversations, focus on the top-tier business media landscape, create more opportunities for executive profiles and uncover the key trends and potential narratives resonating within the industry.

In the post-S-1-filing quiet period, we turned our focus to Twilio’s customers, using their stories to highlight the company’s key offerings, capabilities and core technology.

 

The Big Payoff

Twilio Forbes Cover October 2016

Image via Forbes

As part of the IPO listing day communications strategy, Twilio conducted a live coding demo on the NYSE floor featuring its developers and customers to educate business audiences and the media.

Following the IPO, Highwire continued generating top business coverage by focusing on CEO profiles, including lessons from going public and the company’s continued momentum. Media coverage credited Twilio as an oasis in the tech IPO drought of 2016 and positioned the company as driving the next generation of innovative companies such as Uber and Airbnb.

Media Wins:
  • Forbes cover story
  • Fortune’s 40 Under 40 profile
  • Jeff Lawson awarded TechCrunch Crunchies’ Founder of the Year
  • #8 on Fast Company’s most innovative companies list (#1 in the enterprise tech sector)
  • 310% increase in YOY overall media coverage
  • 552% increase in YOY business press coverage
Twilio's Jeff Lawson on-stage at the 2017 TechCrunch Crunchies accepting the award for Founder of the Year

Twilio’s Jeff Lawson won the TechCrunch Crunchie for Founder of the Year 2017, image via TechCrunch

Business Success:

  • Stock price rose from $15 per share to as high as $70+ per share
  • Captured 84% of industry share of voice; closest competitor was 7%

Telling the story of Twilio’s IPO didn’t happen overnight. Instead, it was the product of our strong partnership built over years. It proved what a PR program based on solid storytelling and thought leadership can do for one of the biggest moments in a company’s history and most importantly beyond.

East Coast vs West Coast? The Best Tech PR Adventure Combines Both

West Coast vs East Coast Infographic

To successfully navigate the East and West Coast tech scenes, you need to wrap your mind around their differences. Each has always offered different cultures and communities to those seeking new opportunities, and this remains true for their respective tech landscapes.

The East Coast hustle and the West Coast chill seem to swap roles, however, when the topic of conversation is turned to the tech industry. The West Coast tech scene is based on a fast-moving mentality, inspired by a highly competitive industry that’s seeded with venture capital. The East Coast, by contrast, is built on a traditional foundation that stems from its academic environment, creating a more cultivating mindset.

Understanding these differing tech scenes could make or break a startup’s success when choosing which coast to call home.    

Rising in the East: On Boston aka “The Innovation Hub”

The academic focus plays a huge role in Boston’s startup industry to form a unified community. Many universities (such as Harvard’s i-lab) as well as more established companies host accelerator programs to offer space, resources and guidance. The heavy academia influence also leads to a tech scene strongly driven by research.

When discussing GE’s recent HQ relocation, chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt said, “We want to be at the center of an ecosystem that shares our aspirations. Greater Boston is home to 55 colleges and universities. Massachusetts spends more on research and development than any other region in the world, and Boston attracts a diverse, technologically fluent workforce focused on solving challenges for the world.”

The Boston industry as a whole is less consumer-based than the West Coast, and more focused on products that help enterprises expand and increase efficiency. The Massachusetts tech scene is also infiltrated by the large presence of its medical community, leading to a strong focus on digital health and biotechnology. All these aspects create a cohesive environment with a nurturing mindset, honing in on growth and long-term goals.

 

Setting Off in the West: On San Francisco and Silicon Valley

As we turn to Silicon Valley, “Pick up the pace” echoes across the country, and the West Coast tech scene is a change of pace in every aspect.

According to NBC News, the West lacks as much of a cohesive community as the East Coast. Instead, the West fuels its fire with passion and speed, leading the Bay Area startup scene to the success it sees today. Driven by young minds and young money, the unique personalities on the West Coast create a short term, fast-paced mentality.

This high-energy environment breeds healthy competition. There is a steady fight to stand out in the crowd and attract a potential investor’s big bucks. There is a larger focus on socializing — which is key to winning big in the Valley. Relationships are the foundation of the industry here. You’ve got to know and find the right people to involve in your business and achieve the highest level of success.

 

Best of Both Worlds

Recognizing that each coast offers a unique perspective, it seems the most reasonable solution to picking a side in the Bay Area vs. Boston battle is to simply choose both. By merging the mindsets of each coast, one gains a deeper understanding of the tech industry as a whole.

Technology and PR: Why is PR So Far Behind Marketing?

The marketing technology landscape has been rapidly expanding over the past five years. In fact, Scott Brinker’s annual Martech Landscape Infographic shows more than a 2000 percent increase in marketing technology vendors since 2011. Yet, the PR section of his report remains relatively unchanged. What’s up with that?

I put this question to Altimeter Group marketing technology analyst (and the first writer to outline the battle field for the marketing cloud wars), Omar Akhtar.

“Tech is always ahead of people and PR happens to be an industry that’s dominated by people and relationships,” says Omar. “Technology has helped streamline and facilitate conversations but automation has been out of the question. However, it’s only a matter of time.”

Marketing Tech Landscape logo collage

Bottom left: PR’s slice of the marketing technology landscape as of 2016

The new era of measurement

According to Omar, measurement is generally the easiest problem for technology to solve in PR. It’s inevitable that the PR industry will be affected in the same way that advertising and marketing measurement has been overhauled.

Companies like TrendKite and AirPR are leading the charge when it comes to PR measurement technology and have been able to reduce time spent reporting by almost 75 percent (According to TrendKite research).

“Technology has led to smarter teams doing higher value work, with much of the drudgery now automated,” says Russ Somer, VP of Marketing at TrendKite.

He goes on to cite a recent presentation from the communications director at a major domestic airline who talked about allowing two days to turn around simple coverage reports and four days to deliver coverage reports with analysis.

“I felt like going up on stage to let her know that her measurement problems were over. Many leaders in PR don’t even realize that these tasks can be automated to the level in which we are doing it.”

Though not yet fully automated—TrendKite and other similar platforms still require customization of search terms to filter out low value media hits—the potential for artificial intelligence to essentially learn which coverage is of value to the company and which articles can be discarded will make instant reporting and analysis par for the course within the next couple of years.

These new measurement platforms are also starting to close the loop and show actions taken from articles. For example, being able to see how many website visits or sign ups are being driven by each piece of earned media.

According to Rebekah Iliff, AirPR’s chief strategy officer, PR’s legacy has been in surface-level metrics like impressions and advertising value equivalency (AVE), but digging deeper into the data can lead to insights for leadership and more effective PR programs.

“For example, a New York Times article might get thousands of eyeballs but fail to spark action with the target audience, while a smaller blog might drive a ton of sign ups and website visits,” explains Iliff. “Advanced analytics gives you the ability to see which outlets are generating better business outcomes so you can be more strategic in pitching media, investing resources to create stories for outlets that move the needle.”

Beyond metrics

Outside of measurement, it can be difficult to imagine how technology will be applied to an industry that relies so heavily on relationships and customized engagement. But one person wrestling with this is Joel Andren, CEO and founder of PitchFriendly.

Described by Andren as CRM for PR people, PitchFriendly helps PR professionals build lists and manage outreach in a similar way to Vocus/Cision, but rather than exporting lists it encourages teams to send pitches from within the app. Pitch templates can be put into the application with placeholders left for customization. Additionally, the system automatically flags media who have recently received pitches, and double-ups.

According to Andren, the company is integrating machine learning to automatically suggest media targets for a pitch based on the content of the pitch and analysis of recent articles by writers.

“Cision and Meltwater are all the same and, as a PR person, they don’t make you any better at your job. In marketing, the first technology is always about proving ROI. We are now building on this base layer of technology to improve how PR is executed,” says Andren.

“Think about every job you give to an intern. Those things should all be automated now, which can free up junior staff to invest more time in training. Technology has the power to automate the tasks that are causing all the employee turnover.”

Whether PR professionals embrace this in-app experience for media relations remains to be seen, and PitchFriendly enables users to engage with media via familiar interfaces like Gmail once the initial pitch has been sent – while continuing to track engagement behind the scenes. Gmail extensions like Mixmax offer similar functionality—the ability to create teams, assign contacts, schedule distributions and track clicks and opens—but don’t offer the deep PR-specific metrics on media engagement that PitchFriendly offers.

Will PR ever be fully automated? Not in the immediate future

PR is more of an art than a science.

Talking to the people driving advances in PR technology, it’s clear that the PR industry has a unique automation problem, which is also the source of great job security.

While data analytics, automation and artificial intelligence will certainly improve the efficiency of certain tasks within PR, the overall effectiveness of PR programs and campaigns will still largely come down to managing and drawing on a confluence of factors outside of the organization’s control. It’s more of an art than an observable and repeatable science.

According to Omar Akhtar, there will always be the need for Madmen and Mathmen (creativity in addition to data analysis)—we can’t rely on either one alone.

“There is always the chance that PR technology could replace people. But I’m convinced, there will always be a job for a clear and concise communicator,” says Akhtar.

“Technology could provide PR spammers easy low-value coverage, but it will be at the expense of the high-value media relationships. A higher level of [machine learning] discernment is needed before PR engagement can be automated,” adds Somer.

Even when it comes to measurement—the part of PR that is well-suited to automation—there are still intangible elements that make evaluating return on investment difficult.

“When PR is done well, there will always be an “X” factor and something that you can’t measure,” says Iliff. “But PR still needs to evolve in the same way that marketing and advertising have evolved with the help of technology.”

Where to Invest?

While PR wrestles with the complexity of relationships and colliding narratives, media budgets and headcount continue to fall. For instance, a negative byproduct of increasing marketing automation has been cut-price display ads and reduced advertising revenues for our friends in the newsroom. Just last month we saw more layoffs at eWEEK, InformationWeek and the Wall Street Journal.

As the pressure mounts for editors and journalists to do more with less, knowing how to break-through the noise of impersonal email to grab their attention will be increasingly valuable for PR people. Similarly, being aware of the digital shortcuts and tools media themselves are using to source content and story ideas is a key requirement for the modern PR person.

The data-driven insights that can be pulled from intelligent measurement and engagement platforms will go a long way to improving the effectiveness of human-to-human media engagement and showing the ROI of PR programs.

The technology we use at Highwire PR:

We’re interested in hearing from you. Where is your company/PR agency investing in PR technology? What new tools are you most excited about?

This blog originally posted on Bulldog Reporter.

Three Trends You’ll See at AWS re:Invent 2016

DevOps, machine learning and global architecture to be key conference trends

Las Vegas skyline at night

Under Armour uses the AWS cloud platform to give more than 180 million users access to its  Connected Fitness platform. Airbnb can store 10 terabytes of user photos with Amazon S3 to house backups and static files. Atlassian deploys its wildly popular HipChat and Bitbucket platforms on it. What do these companies have in common? They all use products from the AWS ecosystem to make their companies more efficient.

With over 24,000 projected attendees, this year’s AWS re:Invent will bring together companies from all over the world to learn more about the organization’s ecosystem and what to look for in 2017.

From Amazon CloudWatch to Amazon GameLift, this conference will have over 400 technical sessions led by industry leaders and AWS partners.

With all this going on, what should you be sure not to miss?

Three trends to watch out for at this conference are DevOps, machine learning and global architecture. Check out our analysis below to help understand how these trends will shape 2017.

DevOps

  • The USA Today description:
    • DevOps encourages communication, collaboration and integration between software developers and IT operations — two business units that have traditionally functioned independently. DevOps is a combination of philosophies, practices and tools to increase the agility of a company’s processes and software development cycle.
  • Why does it matter?
    • DevOps creates a more effective and personalized customer experience, innovates existing software more reliably and accelerates the software delivery cycle. That means faster processes, better service and happier customers.
  • What to expect at AWS re:Invent:
    • Look out for a fireside chat with Groupon, Intuit and LifeLock, as well as a breakout session with AOL on the challenges in providing next-generation applications. These companies are ready to talk about how implementing a DevOps model will protect your company from the competition leading into 2017.  
  • AWS Ecosystem Spotlight, Atlassian:
    • Atlassian Bamboo enables teams to collaborate, build software and serve their customers better. The continuous delivery tool offers strong integrations with AWS for teams to produce software in short cycles that can be built, tested and released faster and more frequently.

Machine Learning

  • The USA Today description:
  • Why does it matter?
    • Machine learning algorithms can be trained over time to make intelligent recommendations for a variety of applications. Machine learning can help with everything from facial recognition, fraud detection and even more accurate medical diagnoses. Ultimately, machine learning will save businesses time and money while delivering a higher quality of service to customers.
  • What to expect at AWS re:Invent:
    • The financial services industry and security functions are going to take the spotlight at re:Invent with use cases in fraud detection and security automation that any company can implement on the AWS platform.

Global (Enterprise) Architecture

  • The USA Today description:
    • Global architecture is a way of building a company’s IT hardware and strategy to support global growth from the beginning. This means solving a broader set of requirements and challenges than other companies that exclusively look domestically.
  • Why does it matter?
    • Running a nationwide IT operation is difficult, but global IT is even more complicated to support. Any company looking to operate globally can expect more pressures, especially related to the availability and quality of service. It’s important for companies to keep this in mind before tackling an international expansion.
  • What to expect at AWS re:Invent:
    • Netflix will present on its journey of failure, innovation and ubiquity as it scaled globally. The session will dive into the architectural patterns that support the streaming giant.